Assisting ROV and Subsea Operations in the "Strait of the Hundred Islands"

High-Resolution Sea Current Forecast

Global MeteOcean Metocean Forecast expertise has been successfully involved to assist multiple sensitive subsea operations in the Makassar Strait, between the main Islands of Borneo and Sulawesi in Indonesia.


ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) systems are widely used in offshore projects to perform various highly sensitive works from structure inspection, positioning, environmental surveys etc.


Even if most ROVs are able to operate within quite harsh metocean conditions, the deployment and scheduling of works need to meet with operational limits and contingencies requiring operations optimization.


Detailed and accurate Wind, Visibility, General Weather, Sea State and Sea Current forecast are taken into account in the set of information to reach the double objectives of launching and recovering the ROV safely and optimizing the operations when knowing the upcoming underwater sea current velocity and direction along the water column, from Surface to bottom.

The operating area was under the effect of distinct current which is part of the known Indonesian Throughflow. The massive amount of water from the Pacific flows between the islands of Indonesia to exit to the Indian Ocean with variability driven by the seasonal Monsoon.

Schematic view of Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) with major passages in plain red color.


Global MeteOcean was requested to implement High Resolution Hydrodynamic model in order to produce detailed Sea Current data calibrated against the sensors deployed in the operating area and data reported by the ROV.

Model simulation result enhanced and displayed from thescreenweather digital platform


If you need more information about Global MeteOcean Sea Current Forecast Product and Services, do contact us at commercial@globalmeteocean.com, we will get back to you 24/7 within few minutes.


Further reading:

Guidelines for Installing ROV Systems on Vessels or Platforms



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